UNDER THE RADAR: Rich Girls – “Loaded”

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UNDER THE RADAR: Rich Girls – “Loaded”.

Rich Girls combines the polish of British art rock with the primitive energy of American garage.

Rich Girls started as the solo project of Luisa Black (The Blacks) during a lonely year in London. After the break-up of her SF/NY-based garage trio, Black decamped to England looking for a new start. She started work on a series of dark pop demos, writing and recording the full band instrumentation herself. Black called the project Rich Girls, an attempt to disguise the fact that it was a lonely solo venture.

 

UNDER THE RADAR: ALT-J SHARE INTENSE VIDEO FOR ‘3WW’

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UNDER THE RADAR: ALT-J SHARE INTENSE VIDEO FOR ‘3WW’.

alt-J’s comeback single from third album ‘RELAXER’, was “an all-encompassing return, defying expectation at every turn”. Its video is as dramatic as the track itself.

The clip, set in the mountains of Mexico, spies in on a funeral procession, and it’s all extremely dark. The video was directed by Alex Takacs (Flying Lotus, Lorde, The xx) and is described by the band’s Gus Unger-Hamilton as “a beautifully shot story of love and loss in the mountains of Mexico”.

.diy

 

BETWEEN JOY DIVISION AND ‘BLUE MONDAY’: NEW ORDER LIVE IN THE EAST VILLAGE, NYC, 1981

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BETWEEN JOY DIVISION AND ‘BLUE MONDAY’: NEW ORDER LIVE IN THE EAST VILLAGE, NYC, 1981.

Before they recorded their classic 1983 album Power Corruption & Lies, New Order made an extended trip to New York and absorbed some of the city’s more upbeat sounds into their own morose and world-weary music. Latin salsa, 12” remix culture and the electronic beats they heard in nightclubs like Danceteria and the Roxy were obvious inspirations for the music they would soon come to make.

But at the time this was videotaped—live at the Ukrainian National Home in New York’s East Village on November 18, 1981—New Order were still largely Joy Division minus Ian Curtis, a post punk band, not the electronic dance quartet they would soon become. It’s a fascinating document of the group during what is perhaps the least documented era of their long career. As I would personally chose Movement over anything else in their catalog, this was a real treat to watch. 

Setlist:
01. 00:00 ICB
02. 04:05 Dreams never end
03. 07:20 Everything’s Gone Green
04. 12:35 Truth
05. 17:15 Senses
06. 21:50 Procession
07. 25:50 Ceremony
08. 30:35 Denial
09. 35:30 Temptation

New York 18 November,1981.

Bernard Sumner (Vocals, Guitar, Keyboards)
Stephen Morris (Percussion, Keyboards)
Gillian Gilbert (Vocals, Guitar, Keyboards)
Peter Hook (Vocals, Bass)

.dangerous minds

 

UNDER THE RADAR: WINSTONS – “KEEP THE BEAT”

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UNDER THE RADAR: WINSTONS – “KEEP THE BEAT”.

The single, “Keep The Beat” is part of, and the first song of the Winstons EP Black Dust.

“Winstons make meat-and-potatoes garage-soul, the kind of no-frills rock that’s best enjoyed live, and they know this. That’s in part why the Brooklyn-by-way-of-Virginia duo, who met while working at Baby’s All Right, make a point of recording live to tape. No-touch ups, no retakes.” – Noisey

 

UNDER THE RADAR: Yoke Lore – “Snowday”

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UNDER THE RADAR: Yoke Lore – “Snowday”.

Brooklyn native Adrian Galvin under his pseudonym Yoke Lore pushes the boundaries of folk music to an exciting and innovative place and no more is this evident than in his brilliant ‘Snow Day’. Galvin manages to fuse the experimentalism and grandeur of Animal Collective with a unique subtly and tenderness, helped in part by his soft, delicate vocals.

The track is now perfectly accompanied by a raw, road-trip style video, which sees Galvin travel from NYC to his father’s house. 

.the 405

 

‘CEREMONY’: PETER HOOK REANIMATES NEW ORDER’S CLASSIC FIRST SINGLE

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I’d hardly be the first to observe that “Ceremony” is THE emblematic song of Joy Division’s sometimes shaky transition to New Order after the suicide of JD singer Ian Curtis. It was a JD song that, tragically, was never properly recorded during the singer’s lifetime; only the live version on Still—from which half the vocals are absent—and a really crummy rehearsal tape are known to have survived, but the song became New Order’s first single.

While that single is imperfect, it preserves a magnificent song that could have ended up lost. The instrumental performances and production are excellent, but vocals were handled by guitarist Bernard Sumner, who’d go on to become the band’s main singer. His tentative, mannered, flat-affect singing style was a good fit for NO’s later work, but his rookie effort couldn’t approach Ian Curtis’ expressive depth, and so lines like “I’ll break them all/No mercy shown” land weightlessly. The song’s excellence still being amply evident, it went on to become one of the most-covered songs the band ever released, and it’s a badge for their determination to persevere in the face of tragedy, however wobbly their very public march towards their own post-Curtis identity was.

In recent years, estranged from his former New Order bandmates, JD/NO’s Peter Hook, the architect of a post-punk bass style so singular and genre-defining it’s still being copied 40 years later, has eschewed original music for a while to devote himself to the project of reanimating his bands’ earliest works. He formed Peter Hook and the Light with members purloined from his prior band Monaco, and they’ve spent the last several years producing concerts in which they’ll play an early JD or NO album in its entirety. They’re currently on tour performing both bands’ ‘80s best-of compilations, both titled Substance.