THIS IS OUR MUSIC: Echo & the Bunnymen – “Crocodiles”, live at London, 18 July 1983

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Watch David J and Peter Murphy Perform Bauhaus Songs After 12 Years Apart

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Watch David J and Peter Murphy Perform Bauhaus Songs After 12 Years Apart.

Peter Murphy and David J reunited in Mexico last night after 12 years apart—for the first in a series of Summer Festival dates celebrating 40 years of their seminal post-punk band Bauhaus.

Peter Murphy and David J opened their set with the trademark “Double Dare”, leading into “In the Flat Field,” “God In An Alcove”, “Silent Hedges,” “Boys”, “She’s In Parties”, “Kick In The Eye”, “Bela Lugosi’s Dead,” “Stigmata Martyr,” “The Passion Of Lovers”, “Dark Entries” and the standard set closer of Bauhaus’s fantastic cover of David Bowie’s “Ziggy Stardust.”

A PRE-VELVET UNDERGROUND NICO’S FIRST SINGLE WITH A YOUNG JIMMY PAGE AND BRIAN JONES

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A PRE-VELVET UNDERGROUND NICO’S FIRST SINGLE WITH A YOUNG JIMMY PAGE AND BRIAN JONES.

Before she became the Teutonic ice queen chanteuse of the Velvet Underground, Nico, via her then boyfriend Rolling Stone Brian Jones, was introduced to Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham and signed to his Immediate Records label, where a young Jimmy Page was employed as house producer, session musician and A&R scout. (Page’s brief career as a session musician saw him adding his distinctive guitar sounds to recordings by The Who, The Kinks, PJ Proby, Lulu, Jackie DeShannon, Van Morrison and Them, Burt Bacharach, French singer Johnny Hallyday, Marianne Faithfull, Vashti Bunyan, Donovan and many others. It’s amusing to think of Jimmy Page being a part of Petula Clark’s “Downtown” single, but there he was. There are several CD compilations of Page’s early session work, probably the best is Hip Young Guitar Slinger.)

Page produced and played on Nico’s sole 1965 single for Immediate, a cover of Canadian folkie Gordon Lightfoot’s “I’m Not Sayin’ ” which was backed by “The Last Mile,” a song composed by Page and Oldham. Jimmy Page plays a six-string in the song, while Brian Jones plays a twelve-string guitar. The single is being re-released by Charly Records in a gatefold sleeve featuring photography by Gered Mankowitz from the original recording session for Record Store Day on April 21.

A promotional film for “I’m Not Sayin’” was shot at the site of London’s West India Docks (now the considerably different looking Canary Wharf) by Peter Whitehead.

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ANDY WARHOL MEETS THE CARS: THE NOTORIOUS NSFW ‘NUDE’ VERSION OF THE ‘HELLO AGAIN’ VIDEO

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ANDY WARHOL MEETS THE CARS: THE NOTORIOUS NSFW ‘NUDE’ VERSION OF THE ‘HELLO AGAIN’ VIDEO.

Technically the “Hello Again” video was co-directed by Andy Warhol and Don Munroe, who had worked with Warhol on his various cable access TV shows in the early 1980s and later Warhol’s short-lived MTV series, but other than showing up I can’t imagine that Warhol actually that all had much else to do with it.

Catching Up With Depeche Mode

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Catching Up With Depeche Mode.

On November 11th, 1985, British synth-pop sensations Depeche Mode were more broadly introduced to the US market with the compilation album Catching Up With Depeche Mode.

The name of the compilation is to be taken quite literally – Since People Are People (the single and the compilation album) turned out to be a big hit in the US, Sire Records wanted to popularize the band a little more with a compilation album that collects the band’s material from 1981 to 1985, and it was released at the same time as the band’s first (European) singles collection The Singles 81→85, that compiled every single the band released to that date. Different from that, Catching Up With Depeche Mode contained album tracks as well, trying to give the US audience a good overview on the band’s effort – including the B-sides tracks Fly On The Windscreen and Flexible.

EXPLODE TOGETHER: XTC MAKES UNRECOGNIZABLE MUSIQUE CONCRÈTE OUT OF ITS OWN CATALOG

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EXPLODE TOGETHER: XTC MAKES UNRECOGNIZABLE MUSIQUE CONCRÈTE OUT OF ITS OWN CATALOG.

Once XTC got going in 1978, they were quite productive—releasing White Music and Go 2 in 1978, Drums and Wires in 1979, and Black Sea in 1980. While they were developing all of those great albums, they (Partridge mainly, it seems) found the time to release an album and a half of intensely cut-up re-workings of the very same tracks that went into those first albums.

In other words, they put out experimental music as if they had decided to “plunderphonic” their own catalog, to borrow a term invented by John Oswald in 1985. Puchasers of Go 2 in its original pressing also received a curious EP with a strikingly similar cover design called Go+. What Go+ turned out to be was a collection of five “dub” re-workings of tracks from Go 2.

That was in 1978. In early 1980 an album was released by, ahem, “Mr. Partridge” under the name Take Away/The Lure of Salvage. (It’s not super clear and sources differ, but I think the idea was that Side 1 was “Take Away” and Side 2 was “The Lure of Salvage.”) The cover art appropriated images from an absolutely fantastic photo shoot conducted at the preposterously palatial house of Jayne Mansfield around 1960. Just like Go+, this album consisted of “dub” reworkings of previously released XTC material.