RARE JAPANESE CONCERT VIDEO OF THE CURE, 1984

Video

RARE JAPANESE CONCERT VIDEO OF THE CURE, 1984.

It’s a curious fact that the first two VHS products the Cure put out were both Japan-only releases, and both are rather difficult to find today. They’re so obscure that even full-length biographies about the Cure often include no information about them.

In 1985 the band put out Live in Japan, which was a full concert recorded at the Nakano Sun Plaza in Tokyo on October 17, 1984. The show was the third and final gig on the Cure’s brief visit to Japan, and the second in as many nights at that venue. The tour was in support for The Top, an album that was put out by Fiction Records in the U.K. and Sire in the U.S.

Given that Live in Japan was the first video product the Cure ever sold, that perforce makes it the first official live video ever put out by the band too. The Cure in Orange, recorded in France in 1986, wouldn’t come out until a couple of years later.

Live in Japan has surfaced on YouTube here and there over the years, but it’s never managed to stay online for very long. For a year now, there has been a high-quality version on YouTube, and it’s likely to stay up there because the uploader was apparently the Cure’s drummer on that tour, Andy Anderson. The lineup for that tour was as follows: Robert Smith, vocals, guitar, violin; Lol Tolhurst, keyboards; Porl Thompson, guitar, keyboards, sax; Phil Thornalley: bass; Andy Anderson, drums.

The video includes some desultory backstage stuff, mainly some quickie interviews and footage of the band enjoying the spread after a gig. Not too exciting unless watching Robert Smith take a steak knife to a pair of chopsticks he has inexpertly separated floats your boat.

Setlist:
Shake Dog Shake
Play For Today
Primary
Wailing Wall
The Empty World
The Hanging Garden
The Walk
One Hundred Years
Give Me It
A Forest
The Top
Charlotte Sometimes
Let’s Go To Bed
The Caterpillar
Boys Don’t Cry
10:15 Saturday Night
Killing An Arab
The Lovecats

.dangerous minds

PETER GABRIEL, LAURIE ANDERSON, OINGO BOINGO, ALLEN GINSBERG, JOHN CAGE & OTHERS USHER IN 1984

Image

http://dangerousminds.net/comments/good_morning_mr._orwell_nam_june_paiks_remarkable_video_extravaganza?utm_source=Dangerous+Minds+newsletter&utm_campaign=af1423ce6c-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ecada8d328-af1423ce6c-65898589

PETER GABRIEL, LAURIE ANDERSON, OINGO BOINGO, ALLEN GINSBERG, JOHN CAGE & OTHERS USHER IN 1984.

George Orwell’s sinister novel Nineteen Eighty-Four made it inevitable that the arrival of his eponymous year would be a media event. Decades after his death, Orwell made it onto the cover of Time magazine in late 1983, but on the big day itself—January 1, 1984—TV visionary Nam June Paik ushered in the year with an ambitious international video program called Good Morning, Mr. Orwell that was broadcast live simultaneously from New York (WNET public television), Paris, and San Francisco, with broadcasters in Germany and South Korea also carrying the transmissions if not contributing content.

Among the performances: Gabriel and Anderson combine on a duet called “Excellent Birds”; a fitfully amusing comedy sketch called “Cavalcade of Intellectuals” in which a transatlantic discussion devolves into an interpersonal spat (a gag that worked better in Airplane! using airport PA announcers); a sprightly song by Yves Montand; John Cage plays “amplified cacti and plant materials” with a feather (so great); Oingo Boingo perform a song called “Wake Up (It’s 1984)”; Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky sing a little ditty about meditation to the cello stylings of Arthur Russell; and much more.

GANG OF FOUR DELIVER AN ELECTRIFYING SET AT A CROATIAN FESTIVAL IN 1981

Video

GANG OF FOUR DELIVER AN ELECTRIFYING SET AT A CROATIAN FESTIVAL IN 1981.

This fantastic footage of Gang of Four performing a 22-minute set at the Music Biennale Zagreb festival in Croatia, on May 15, 1981.

The performance comes a couple months after the release of the classic post-punk act’s sophomore album, “Solid Gold”, and mixes material from that record and the band’s seminal 1979 debut “Entertainment!”

Setlist:
1. “Paralysed”
2. “Not Great Men”
3. “Return the Gift”
4. “What We All Want”
5. “Natural’s Not In It”
6. “Damaged Goods”

 

FULL COCTEAU TWINS CONCERT FROM 1990’S “HEAVEN OR LAS VEGAS TOUR”

Video

FULL COCTEAU TWINS CONCERT FROM 1990’S “HEAVEN OR LAS VEGAS TOUR”.

Concert filmed Nov. 1, 1990, at London’s Town & Country during the “Heaven or Las Vegas” tour.

setlist:

– Blue Bell Knoll
– From the Flagstones
– My Love Paramour
– Cico Buff
– Iceblink Luck
– Orange Appled
– Wolf in the Breast
– Crushed
– Pitch the Baby
– Cherry-Coloured Funk
– Road, River and Rail
– A Kissed Out Red Floatboat
– Heaven or Las Vegas
– Aikea-Guinea
– Pink Orange Red
Encore:
– Whales Tails
– Mizake the Mizan

 

MORRISSEY’S FIRST SOLO CONCERT WAS MINOR BEDLAM

Video

MORRISSEY’S FIRST SOLO CONCERT WAS MINOR BEDLAM.

Footage of his first solo gig, in 1988 at Wolverhampton Civic Hall, which also kinda doubled as The Smiths’ farewell. The rhythm section here is a pre-lawsuit Mike Joyce and Andy Rourke, and the guitarist is Craig Gannon, who served the Smiths as bassist during Rourke’s brief 1986 ouster from the band, and became their touring rhythm guitarist thereafter. As The Smiths split up before the release of their final album, Strangeways, Here We Come, this was the only live performance of some of that material ever undertaken by this many Smiths at once.

Per the wonderful online Smiths/Morrissey archive Passions Just Like Mine:

Admission was free to anyone wearing a Smiths or Morrissey shirt. Only half the fans who traveled to Wolverhampton made it inside the venue. Outside the queuing and organisation almost turned to chaos. The atmosphere inside was obviously very charged. There was a great deal of cheering and chanting Morrissey’s name to the English football tune. Throughout the short set many fans made it on stage, much more than for a typical Smiths concert.

Morrissey came on stage to a thunder of applause, after a long period of cheering and chanting. In the first song, “Stop Me If You Think You’ve Heard This One Before”, he sang “And so I drank one, or was it four?” instead of “… it became four”. He actually sang that line as it had been originally written and not as it appeared on “Strangeways Here We Come”. Before “Interesting Drug” which had yet to be released and was unknown to the fans, Morrissey started “This song is called…” but never managed to finish his introduction. In that song just like in the previous one, “Disappointed”, Morrissey missed many lines because of the mayhem with the fans on stage.

.dangerous minds

POWERFUL SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES PERFORMANCE: LIVE AT ‘THE FUTURAMA FESTIVAL,’ 1980

Video

POWERFUL SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES PERFORMANCE: LIVE AT ‘THE FUTURAMA FESTIVAL,’ 1980.

On September 13th and 14th, 1980, the second installment of “The Futurama Festival” was held in Leeds, a city in the English county of Yorkshire. This year the lineup included a cavalcade of incredible acts like Echo and the Bunnymen (fronted by a 21-year-old Ian McCulloch), The Psychedelic Furs, Athletico Spizz 80, U2, Wasted Youth and Siouxsie & The Banshees, headed up by a then 23-year-old Siouxsie Sioux. Apparently this was also one of the very earliest Soft Cell performances.

The seven-minute clip captures the band on top of their game performing two songs, “Paradise Place” from the 1980 album Kaleidoscope and “Eve White/Eve Black” which was released in 1980 as the B-side to the band’s “Christine” single.

Siouxsie & The Banshees performing at the Futurama Festival, Saturday, September 13th, 1980.

.dangerous minds

SAINT JULIAN: JULIAN COPE LIVE IN NYC, 1987

Video

SAINT JULIAN: JULIAN COPE LIVE IN NYC, 1987.

Recorded Live: 7/6/1987 – Ritz (now Webster Hall) (New York, NY).
A set largely comprised of songs from Saint Julian and his first two solo albums (just one Teardrop Explodes number).

Setlist:
0:00:00 – Trampolene
0:03:30 – Pulsar
0:06:18 – Eve’s Volcano
0:10:10 – Strasbourg
0:12:49 – Saint Julian
0:15:57 – Sunspots
0:22:00 – Nonalignment Pact
0:24:45 – Bouncing Babies
0:26:57 – The Greatest Imperfection Is Love
0:32:47 – Bandy’s First Jump
0:35:35 – Shot Down
0:39:28 – Spacehopper/World Shut Your Mouth
0:51:32 – I’ve Got Levitation

Julian Cope – vocals, guitar; Donald Ross Skinner – electric & slide guitar; James Eller – bass; Keith Richard Frost – keyboards; Chris Whitten – drums.

IN CONCERT: Ramones – Live At The Rainbow – December 31, 1977

Video

IN CONCERT: Ramones – Live At The Rainbow – December 31, 1977.

I know people like to watch. Here’s what I consider to be the only live footage of The Ramones that comes close to communicating how powerful they were in the flesh. The Ramones live at The Rainbow, December 31, 1977. Play it fucking loud!!!

The Ramones played the Rainbow Theater in London on December 31, 1977. The show became It’s Alive, which was released in April 1979. It’s Alive is considered one of the best punk records of all time. Enjoy.

Blitzkrieg Bop
I Wanna Be Well
Glad to See You Go
You’re Gonna Kill That Girl
Commando
Havana Affair
Cretin Hop
Listen to My Heart
I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You
Pinhead
Do You Wanna Dance?
Now I Wanna Be a Good Boy
Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue
We’re A Happy Family

.dangerous minds

ECHO AND THE BUNNYMEN ROCK LIVERPOOL ON BBC 2’S ‘POP CARNIVAL,’ 1982

Video

ECHO AND THE BUNNYMEN ROCK LIVERPOOL ON BBC 2’S ‘POP CARNIVAL,’ 1982.

In the summer of 1982, Echo and the Bunnymen were the top act (at least in retrospect, if not at the time) to play the Larks in the Park festival at Sefton Park in Liverpool. The three-day fest, at which admission was free, also featured Frankie Goes To Hollywood (three months before the release of “Relax”) as well as Bow Wow Wow, which was probably the most conventionally famous act on the bill at that moment. One of the cool things about the Larks in the Park festival, as we shall see, was the proximity of a large-ish lake. Spectators were invited to gather in front of the “ornate Victorian bandstand” or lie down in the grass or even splash around in the lake. This was the third year of the festival; Delado, Crossection, and Hambi and the Dance also played that year, according to this contemporaneous account from NME.

1982 was the year Echo and the Bunnymen didn’t release any LPs—Heaven Up Here had come out in May 1981, and fans would have to wait until February 1983 for the third album, Porcupine. The Larks in the Park festival was in late August, and two days earlier, the band had played the Peppermint Lounge in New York, their second visit to the U.S. After this they took a break from touring, their next show was in December.

Pop Carnival was an intriguing show that ran on BBC 2 for a couple of years from 1982 to 1984, highlighting “open-air pop concerts” by acts like Clint Eastwood and General Saint (a reggae DJ duo), JoBoxers, Nick Heyward, Tears for Fears, and Big Country. The host of the show was Steve Blacknell.

According to setlist.fm, Echo and the Bunnymen played a full set that night, but the BBC elected to show only the second half. The full setlist looks like this:

Fuel
With a Hip
Show of Strength
All That Jazz
A Promise
No Dark Things
Crocodiles
Higher Hell
Rescue
All My Colours (Zimbo)
The Back of Love
Heads Will Roll
Heaven Up Here
Over the Wall
Do It Clean
Remarkably, Pop Carnival picks up the action in medias res, halfway through “Rescue.” The sound and image quality are both excellent. In the second half of the show you can see a handful of revelers cavorting in the lake—which activity sounds completely awesome. The telecast ran on October 12, 1982.

.dangerous minds