THE WONDERFUL AND FRIGHTENING WORLD OF MARK E. SMITH

Video

‘THE WONDERFUL AND FRIGHTENING WORLD OF MARK E. SMITH’

The Fall were famously the favorite band of legendary BBC DJ John Peel—the Fall recorded a whopping 24 Peel sessions, the most of any act, and the 2005 box set containing all of them is essential listening for any Fall devotee—the second disc in particular is fucking great.

The BBC documentary The Wonderful and Frightening World of Mark E. Smith obviously cribs its name from the Fall’s similarly titled album of 1984. The program documents the Fall’s origins, including their first recording session, which was financed by Buzzcocks manager Richard Boon, through their furtive (Brix-fueled) attempts at wider popularity in the 1980s, to their, or rather, his more or less current status as undeniably batshit punk elder.

The interview features interviews with past members Una Baines, Marc Riley, and Steve Hanley as well as (of course) tons of commentary from Smith himself, virtually all of which is damned hard to understand for U.S. viewers, which of course adds to the charm and mystique of it all.

.dangerous minds

 

BANANA: AFTER 50 YEARS THE ULTIMATE WARHOL VELVET UNDERGROUND MYSTERY IS FINALLY (ALMOST) SOLVED!!

http://dangerousminds.net/comments/after_50_years_the_ultimate_warhol_velvet_underground_mystery_is_finally_al?utm_source=Dangerous+Minds+newsletter&utm_campaign=081a72923c-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ecada8d328-081a72923c-65898589

BANANA: AFTER 50 YEARS THE ULTIMATE WARHOL VELVET UNDERGROUND MYSTERY IS FINALLY (ALMOST) SOLVED!!

It was fifty years ago this week that the future began with the Velvet Underground, Andy Warhol, and his banana. The destruction and rebuilding of rock ‘n’ roll music as it then existed commenced. This was all taking place even though only a few people knew about it at the time. The right few, as always. I have to think that anyone reading this knows the history of the Velvet Underground so I’m not going to rehash it here.

 

 

HOW TO MAKE AN ACID HOUSE CLASSIC: BRITISH DOC LOOKS AT THE BUSINESS OF HAPPY MONDAYS’ ‘BUMMED’ (2/2)

Video

HOW TO MAKE AN ACID HOUSE CLASSIC: BRITISH DOC LOOKS AT THE BUSINESS OF HAPPY MONDAYS’ ‘BUMMED’ (2/2)

Factory Records released the Happy Mondays’ second album Bummed, which was the band’s first real breakthrough, and the Granada TV show Information Technology in the U.K. released an episode depicting the business decisions that went into what proved to be one of the touchstones of acid house culture.

The documentary, which lasts about 20 minutes, takes us through three “Decisions,” those being “Recording Budget,” “Promotion Budget,” and “How Many to Make.” The strategy the filmmakers adopt is mostly fly-on-the-wall, so viewers have to glean information as best they can.

The affable Tony Wilson is our guide through some of the process, during which we see Tony Michaelides, Factory head of PR, grumbling about Shaun Ryder and Co. failing to appear for a radio interview; the esteemed producer Martin Hannett twiddling knobs at a console while the band lays down tracks; and manager Nathan McGough patiently explaining that Happy Mondays are worth the trouble even though they are a pain in the ass.

We also see the band and their friends at Central Station Design deciding on the album artwork as well as what the first single should be. (It was “Wrote for Luck.”)

The program ends with a glimpse of the band playing a show at Dingwalls on January 9, 1989. In the clip, the song they are singing is “Do It Better.” Features some decent footage of Bez doing his Bez “freaky dancing.”

.dangerous minds

 

HOW TO MAKE AN ACID HOUSE CLASSIC: BRITISH DOC LOOKS AT THE BUSINESS OF HAPPY MONDAYS’ ‘BUMMED’ (1/2)

Video

HOW TO MAKE AN ACID HOUSE CLASSIC: BRITISH DOC LOOKS AT THE BUSINESS OF HAPPY MONDAYS’ ‘BUMMED’ (1/2)

Factory Records released the Happy Mondays’ second album Bummed, which was the band’s first real breakthrough, and the Granada TV show Information Technology in the U.K. released an episode depicting the business decisions that went into what proved to be one of the touchstones of acid house culture.

The documentary, which lasts about 20 minutes, takes us through three “Decisions,” those being “Recording Budget,” “Promotion Budget,” and “How Many to Make.” The strategy the filmmakers adopt is mostly fly-on-the-wall, so viewers have to glean information as best they can.

The affable Tony Wilson is our guide through some of the process, during which we see Tony Michaelides, Factory head of PR, grumbling about Shaun Ryder and Co. failing to appear for a radio interview; the esteemed producer Martin Hannett twiddling knobs at a console while the band lays down tracks; and manager Nathan McGough patiently explaining that Happy Mondays are worth the trouble even though they are a pain in the ass.

We also see the band and their friends at Central Station Design deciding on the album artwork as well as what the first single should be. (It was “Wrote for Luck.”)

The program ends with a glimpse of the band playing a show at Dingwalls on January 9, 1989. In the clip, the song they are singing is “Do It Better.” Features some decent footage of Bez doing his Bez “freaky dancing.”

.dangerous minds

 

WATCH TALKING HEADS PLAY “PSYCHO KILLER” AT CBGB IN 1975

Video

WATCH TALKING HEADS PLAY “PSYCHO KILLER” AT CBGB IN 1975.

In his fantastic book Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever, Rolling Stone critic Will Hermes writes about Talking Heads’ first performance at CBGB on June 5, 1975: “[T]he band sounded like a cross between the Modern Lovers and Television minus the latter’s guitar sparks: strangulated vocals, rudimentary bass lines, and martial little-drummer-boy beats that hinted at soul music. [David] Byrne had just turned twenty-three; Tina [Weymouth] and Chris [Frantz] were twenty-four.”

If Hermes’ description piques your interest, then you’ll definitely want to check out the video below. NPR has posted a clip of Talking Heads playing “Psycho Killer” at CBGB later that year, from the new DVD documentary Chronology. The footage, preceded by Seymour Stein’s reminiscences of the band’s early days, is fantastic. Most fascinating of all is seeing Byrne before he’d figured out his twitchy, electric frontman schtick.

.flavorwire

 

THE BLACK FLAG TOUR MACHINE GRINDS TO A HALT IN ‘REALITY 86’D’

Video

THE BLACK FLAG TOUR MACHINE GRINDS TO A HALT IN ‘REALITY 86’D’.

To support what would prove to be its last studio album In My Head, Black Flag did a full national tour in the autumn of 1985 and then basically repeated the process in the first half of 1986. For that second go-round—Black Flag’s last tour—they were joined by Painted Willie and Greg Ginn’s new side project Gone, which featured future Rollins Band members Sim Cain and Andrew Weiss.

The drummer for Painted Willie was named David Markey, one of the founders of the punk zine We Got Power! and he took along a video recorder and took a copious amount of footage during the several months.

The result of Markey’s filming was an hour-long movie called Reality 86’d.

.dangerous minds