24 HOUR PARTYING PEOPLE: HAPPY MONDAY, IT’S THE HAPPY MONDAYS!

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24 HOUR PARTYING PEOPLE: HAPPY MONDAY, IT’S THE HAPPY MONDAYS!

For those of you who might’ve missed out on their roguelike charms back when the drugs were still working for them and not against them, here’s a sampling of classic Happy Mondays from, uh… when they were peaking?

‘LOVE BITES’: A CHARMING DOCUMENTARY ON MORRISSEY SUPER-FANS FROM 1995

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‘LOVE BITES’: A CHARMING DOCUMENTARY ON MORRISSEY SUPER-FANS FROM 1995.

Though at times the various accents from some the fans featured in Love Bites are difficult to understand, it doesn’t prevent you from clearly seeing how utterly devoted they are to the former Smiths crooner.

The documentary is based on a lovely group of people who followed Morrissey around during the early 1990s when he was out supporting his 1992 album Your Arsenal and 1994’s Vauxhall & I in the U.K.

The first-hand accounts from the “irregular regulars” is pretty endearing stuff—especially when it comes to how seeing Moz live makes them feel, such as a young female fan who equated the experience to “attending the church of Morrissey.” Many of Moz’s male fans have their hair styled just like their idol and there’s even a guy who tricked out his scooter with pictures of Morrissey all over it.

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TWO ALBUMS, FOUR SINGLES: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CULT ELECTRONIC SYNTH BAND YAZOO

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TWO ALBUMS, FOUR SINGLES: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CULT ELECTRONIC SYNTH BAND YAZOO.

Yazoo/Yaz consisted of Alison “Alf” Moyet on vocals and Vince Clarke on synthesizer. The band formed in late 1981 after Clarke replied to an advert Moyet posted in Melody Maker looking for a “rootsy blues band.” Clarke had been the founder and chief songwriter at Depeche Mode. He quit that band because he was “fed up.” What with isn’t clear. What’s probable is that Clarke wanted to spend more time in the studio and develop his own unique electronic sound. For whatever reason, Clarke left Depeche Mode after writing most of the band’s first album and their first three hits “Dreaming of Me,” “New Life,” and “I Just Can’t Get Enough.”

t’s a good PR story that Moyet and Clarke didn’t know each other until that fateful ad in Melody Maker, but the truth was they had known of knew each other for quite some time. They both lived in Basildon and had both attended the same weekend music school as kids. Clarke had heard Moyet sing. He was more than impressed. Moyet has an incredible voice. And he was the keyboard wizard who wanted to do something different.

Clarke had the song “Only You.” He had offered it Depeche Mode as a farewell present but his ex-bandmates thought it wasn’t quite right as it sounded like something they’d already heard. They were wrong but it didn’t hamper their meteoric career. Moyet didn’t really like synthpop. Clarke was undeterred. He played her the track. Moyet sang the lyrics. Yazoo was formed.

According to Clarke, when they played “Only You” to Daniel Miller, the head of Mute Records, he seemed disinterested. But when the publishing company gave it a listen, they knew they had a hit. Yazoo was signed. Now a B-side was required. The only track Clarke and Moyet had was “Don’t Go” which was too good a song to fill out a B-side. They quickly recorded “Situation,” which was the first club hit by which Yaz/Yazoo became known in America.

The documentary on Yazoo : 2 Albums, 4 Singles and That was It tells you everything you need to know about Moyet and Clarke and their fast but highly successful and influential career.

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DEVO MEET WILLIAM BURROUGHS: ‘DAVID BOWIE WOULD NEVER MAKE AN AUDIENCE SHIT THEIR PANTS. WE WOULD.’

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DEVO MEET WILLIAM BURROUGHS: ‘DAVID BOWIE WOULD NEVER MAKE AN AUDIENCE SHIT THEIR PANTS. WE WOULD.’

According to Isler’s intro, Burroughs was on hand to promote Cities of the Red Night, his first novel in a decade, while DEVO was between albums. Their most recent effort was New Traditionalists, released several months earlier. Oh, No! It’s Devo wouldn’t hit the shelves until the end of 1982.

By the way, “DEVO” is here defined as the two main spokesmen for the group, Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, who are both identified as fans of Burroughs in the intro to the piece. Unexpectedly, almost as soon as the interview is underway, Casale goes into a lengthy explication of DEVO’s goals and methods. Casale cites Burroughs’s 1974 conversation with David Bowie in Rolling Stone about “sonic warfare” and then the Casale and Burroughs speculate as to how much abuse it’s proper for an artist to put his or her audience through. Death is too far, surely, but “making them shit their pants”?

Really, contra Robbins, the entire interview is worth a read. Casale/Mothersbaugh on one side and Burroughs on the other both have passionate, precise takes on the malaise haunting the capitalist West, but they disagree on some things and have no compunction in pointing that out. For instance, Burroughs blandly asserts that a great deal of positive change has occurred in recent decades, a view that Casale finds to be nonsense.

Here’s the Trouser Press presentation of the interview, followed by the NME version:

 

THE SEX PISTOLS, THE CLASH AND SIOUXSIE AND THE BANSHEES ON EARLY TV DOCUMENTARY ‘PUNK’ FROM 1976

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THE SEX PISTOLS, THE CLASH AND SIOUXSIE AND THE BANSHEES ON EARLY TV DOCUMENTARY ‘PUNK’ FROM 1976.

A band called the Sex Pistols were playing gigs in and around London. Promoter Ron Watts saw them rip up the joint at a gig in High Wycombe in early 1976. It was like nothing he’d ever seen before. This was the start of the future. This was what everyone was waiting for. He booked the band to appear at the legendary blues and jazz 100 Club in London. He organized a weekend festival called The 100 Club Punk Special for September 20th and 21st, 1976. The line-up was the Sex Pistols, the Clash, Siouxsie and the Banshees, the Damned, the Buzzcocks, Subway Sect, Stinky Toys and Chris Spedding & the Vibrators. 

When the Sex Pistols hit the stage, everything changed. “In one night,” Watts later wrote in his autobiography Hundred Watts: A Life in Music, “punk went from an underground cult to a mass movement.”

The Sex Pistols had killed off one generation’s music and announced something new.

…[T]his was the big one, the first day of a new era. Nothing could compare with it either before or since.

Onstage, Johnny Rotten was “insulting, cajoling everyone in the room, his eyes bulging dementedly as he made the audience as much a part of the show as the band.” The group tore through their set to a thrilled and enthusiastic audience. The Clash played their set, while Siouxsie and the Banshees had improvised a set around “The Lord’s Prayer.” A week later, a crowd 600 deep formed a line at the door of the 100 Club.

Smart enough to recognize the importance of what had happened, investigative reporter Janet Street-Porter fronted a half-hour feature on the Sex Pistols and co. called “Punk’ for local TV program The London Weekend Show . First broadcast on November 28th, 1976, “Punk” contained some of the very first if not the first television interviews with Johnny Rotten, Steve Jones, Glen Matlock, and Paul Cook, as well as Siouxsie, Steven Severin (aka Steve Spunker) and Joe Strummer, Mick Jones and Paul Simonon of the Clash. Here are the witness statements of the feelings and the facts.

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THE CRAMPS PLAY SOME OF THEIR FAVORITE SINGLES ON BBC RADIO, 1984

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THE CRAMPS PLAY SOME OF THEIR FAVORITE SINGLES ON BBC RADIO, 1984.

In 1984, Lux Interior and Poison Ivy Rorschach were the guests on a BBC Radio 1 show that was apparently called Collectors’ Choice and hosted by veteran DJ Kid Jensen. They brought a short stack of singles and the secret teachings of all ages. Unlike many broadcasts of this kind that turn up on the webs, this one includes all the records Lux and Ivy selected for the show, perhaps because safeguarding Marvin Rainwater’s copyright is not the RIAA’s most urgent concern.

The interview is an education. Lux makes the case for (well, asserts) Link Wray being the “first progressive rock guitarist” and Ivy explains why the names of some East L.A. bands start with “Thee.”

Threatening to answer Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” with a single of their own called “Rockabilly Jean,” they diagnose the problem with our modern American sounds:

Lux: I hope that somehow people will forget about this “No Elvis, Beatles or the Rolling Stones” and get back into the history of rock ‘n’ roll, and get back into the simplicity of it, and the stripped-down, rock ‘n’ roll, nuclear warfare, over-the-topness of what it was when it first started, because there’s just something missing today. Everybody’s either out for their career, or something, making pop music, or making really involved musical things, you know, and rock ‘n’ roll is just so simple and so direct, it doesn’t seem like there are very many people who have a handle on understanding what that is.

Kid Jensen: Many people who would agree with you would regard rock ‘n’ roll as disposable, though. They would say it’s there to be listened to, two-minute records, that’s it. Throw it away.

Lux: Well, but they’re disposable people, though, so it doesn’t matter.

Kid Jensen: ‘Cause you obviously cherish these old records.

Lux: Oh, yeah. These are magic items, these records.

The DJ set:

Cannibal & the Headhunters “Zulu King” (3:10)
Thee Midniters “Jump, Jive, and Harmonize” (9:24)
Andre Williams “Pass the Biscuits Please” (14:23)
Marvin Rainwater “Hot and Cold” (21:37)
Starlites “Valarie” (26:59)

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VPRO Detroit Rawk!!!: Detroit Music Scene Documentary – White Stripes and the Dirtbombs, Demolition Doll Rods and the Paybacks

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VPRO Detroit Rawk!!!: Detroit Music Scene Documentary – White Stripes and the Dirtbombs, Demolition Doll Rods and the Paybacks.

In 2001 the Dutch TV station VPRO sent a crew to Detroit to document the goings-on, with a focus on (of course) the White Stripes. The program was directed by René Hazekamp and the interviews were conducted by Helmut Boeijen. The Dirtbombs’ Mick Collins is the closest thing the show has to an MC, we follow him around on Detroit’s People Mover as he explains the nuances of the Detroit scene.

Technically, the title of the show is Detroit Rawk!!! In addition to the White Stripes and the Dirtbombs, the program checks in with the Demolition Doll Rods and the Paybacks.

Towards the end of the program Jack is explaining that they had turned down a million bucks from the Gap to do a Christmas commercial, and makes the mistake of invoking Donny and Marie. Their friend and manager Arthur Dottweiler hilariously gives them endless shit for it. “You guys are not Donny and Marie!! You think you’re Donny and Marie?? Do you guys have your own network prime time television program??”

Dude did have a point.

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DOC: NEIL YOUNG: DON’T BE DENIED (Fantastic Documentary with Buffalo, CSNY and Crazy Horse)

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DOC: NEIL YOUNG: DON’T BE DENIED (Fantastic Documentary with Buffalo, CSNY and Crazy Horse).

Neil Young: Don’t Be Denied….BBC documentary charting Neil’s career from his first experiences in Canada through his trip south and his time with Buffalo Springfield, CSNY and Crazy Horse. Whilst he is claiming it is just about the music, the film shows Neil as a man of great integrity both musically and politically. Fascinating stuff.

Neil Young grants rare and unprecedented access to the BBC for a documentary in which he traces his musical journey in his own words.

The film was made from three hours of interview shot in New York and California, and uses previously unseen performance footage from the star’s own extensive archives. It also features cohorts Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, David Crosby, Nils Lofgren and James Taylor.

From his early transcontinental American quest for recognition, through the first flush of success with Buffalo Springfield, to the bi-polar opposites of mega-stardom with Crosby, Stills and Nash and the soulful rock of Crazy Horse, Young’s career has enjoyed many guises.

Perhaps his most famous period was as a 1970s solo artist making albums that became benchmarks. After The Goldrush, recorded in his Topanga Canyon home, and Harvest, part-recorded on his northern Californian ranch, saw Young explore the confessional side of song-writing. But never one to rest on his laurels, he would continually change direction.

In the mid-seventies, two of Young’s closest friends died as a result of heroin abuse. What followed was music’s answer to cinema verite, with Tonight’s The Night a spine-chilling wake for his dead friends.

As New Wave arrived, Young was keen to explore new ideas. A collaboration with Devo on what became his art-house epic, Human Highway, saw the genesis of Rust Never Sleeps, a requiem for the seventies.

In the eighties, Young explored different genres, from electronica to country, and in recent times he has returned to Crazy Horse and Crosby, Stills and Nash, but only when it has suited him.

The film ends with Young still refusing to be denied, on tour in the USA with CSNY, playing anti-Bush songs to a Republican audience in the South.
Credit BBC4

WATCH MURDOC AND 2D OF GORILLAZ DISCUSS THEIR NEW ALBUM IN FIRST-EVER ON-CAMERA INTERVIEW

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WATCH MURDOC AND 2D OF GORILLAZ DISCUSS THEIR NEW ALBUM IN FIRST-EVER ON-CAMERA INTERVIEW.

Today, on a YouTube livestream, Murdoc Niccals and 2D—that is to say, Jamie Hewlett and Damon Albarn—from the British avatar-fronted hip-hop/electro group Gorillaz sat down with British DJ MistaJam on Radio 1. During their first-ever on-camera interview, conducted in the band’s animated house, Murdoc took credit for the twerking phenomenon and 2D claimed that Simon Cowell gifted him his jeans.

The interview is promo for Gorillaz’s forthcoming album Humanz, which is due out on April 28.

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